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Has a doge icon and supports us. You can send ANY amount of dogecoin. Donation adress: DKJGUDaeMnjqW28hwPftiAtXMoYpthzrf6
Current Server Time 2020-11-26 15:02:40
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Opened capsules Opened 1904
Sealed capsules Sealed 917
Sealed in 20 May 2020 06:44:15
Opened at: 18 August 2020 00:00:00
Sealed with Dogecoin idk?

Age: 3 months Observers 0 Views : 59 Owner: Cyrus James
Owner: Cyrus James
Sealed in 18 January 2015 23:50:52
Opened at: 16 August 2020 21:00:00
The future in my eyes...

Physical currency will be eliminated and Crypto-Currency will take over.

Humans will no longer use electronic devices, instead they will be implanted into their body through various augmentations.

Age: 68 months Observers 0 Views : 51
Sealed in 24 July 2020 11:33:26
Opened at: 14 August 2020 00:00:00
my time capsule : )

hi! its me, Luiza! We are in 2020 and we are in quarentine,because of coronavirus. I like now united and black Pink, my favorite channel on youtube is LOUD . I have a dog and her name is Meg , she is very happy because everybody is inside the house with her:)

Age: 3 weeks Observers 0 Views : 60
Sealed in 13 August 2020 01:42:13
Opened at: 13 August 2020 01:42:13
qui

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Age: 0 minute Observers 0 Views : 61 Owner: oak
Owner: oak
Sealed in 12 August 2020 10:57:42
Opened at: 12 August 2020 10:57:42
God of War revelado na E3

Durante a E3 (ou eventos que a substituam) será revelado o novo God of War feito pela Santa Monica Studios. (Chute: Kratos morre no final e Atreus segue na série)

Age: 0 minute Observers 1 Has 1 observer Views : 61 Owner: Jesus
Owner: Jesus
Sealed in 21 February 2016 19:13:26
Opened at: 08 August 2020 05:00:00
Sealed with Dogecoin Technology Prediction: We can use Memory-boosting implants in our brains to convert short-term into long-term memories

Memory loss seems to be inescapable. But one maverick neuroscientist is working hard on an electronic cure. Funded by DARPA, Dr. Theodore Berger, a biomedical engineer at the University of Southern California, is testing a memory-boosting implant that mimics the kind of signal processing that occurs when neurons are laying down new long-term memories.

The revolutionary implant, already shown to help memory encoding in rats and monkeys, is now being tested in human patients with epilepsy — an exciting first that may blow the field of memory prosthetics wide open.

To get here, however, the team first had to crack the memory code.

Deciphering Memory

From the very onset, Berger knew he was facing a behemoth of a problem.

We weren’t looking to match everything the brain does when it processes memory, but to at least come up with a decent mimic, said Berger.

“Of course people asked: can you model it and put it into a device? Can you get that device to work in any brain? It’s those things that lead people to think I’m crazy. They think it’s too hard,” he said.

But the team had a solid place to start.

The hippocampus, a region buried deep within the folds and grooves of the brain, is the critical gatekeeper that transforms memories from short-lived to long-term. In dogged pursuit, Berger spent most of the last 35 years trying to understand how neurons in the hippocampus accomplish this complicated feat.

At its heart, a memory is a series of electrical pulses that occur over time that are generated by a given number of neurons, said Berger. This is important — it suggests that we can reduce it to mathematical equations and put it into a computational framework, he said.

Berger hasn’t been alone in his quest.

By listening to the chatter of neurons as an animal learns, teams of neuroscientists have begun to decipher the flow of information within the hippocampus that supports memory encoding. Key to this process is a strong electrical signal that travels from CA3, the “input” part of the hippocampus, to CA1, the “output” node.

This signal is impaired in people with memory disabilities, said Berger, so of course we thought if we could recreate it using silicon, we might be able to restore — or even boost — memory.

A Human Memory Implant

Last year, the team cautiously began testing their memory implant prototype in human volunteers.

Because of the risks associated with brain surgery, the team recruited 12 patients with epilepsy, who already have electrodes implanted into their brain to track down the source of their seizures.

Repeated seizures steadily destroy critical parts of the hippocampus needed for long-term memory formation, explained Berger. So if the implant works, it could benefit these patients as well.

The team asked the volunteers to look through a series of pictures, and then recall which ones they had seen 90 seconds later. As the participants learned, the team recorded the firing patterns in both CA1 and CA3 — that is, the input and output nodes.

Using these data, the team extracted an algorithm — a specific human “memory code” — that could predict the pattern of activity in CA1 cells based on CA3 input. Compared to the brain’s actual firing patterns, the algorithm generated correct predictions roughly 80% of the time.

It’s not perfect, said Berger, but it’s a good start.

Using this algorithm, the researchers have begun to stimulate the output cells with an approximation of the transformed input signal.

We have already used the pattern to zap the brain of one woman with epilepsy, said Dr. Dong Song, an associate professor working with Berger. But he remained coy about the result, only saying that although promising, it’s still too early to tell.

Song’s caution is warranted. Unlike the motor cortex, with its clear structured representation of different body parts, the hippocampus is not organized in any obvious way.

It’s hard to understand why stimulating input locations can lead to predictable results, said Dr. Thoman McHugh, a neuroscientist at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute. It’s also difficult to tell whether such an implant could save the memory of those who suffer from damage to the output node of the hippocampus.

“That said, the data is convincing,” McHugh acknowledged.

Berger, on the other hand, is ecstatic. “I never thought I’d see this go into humans,” he said.

But the work is far from done. Within the next few years, Berger wants to see whether the chip can help build long-term memories in a variety of different situations. After all, the algorithm was based on the team’s recordings of one specific task — what if the so-called memory code is not generalizable, instead varying based on the type of input that it receives?

Berger acknowledges that it’s a possibility, but he remains hopeful.

I do think that we will find a model that’s a pretty good fit for most conditions, he said. After all, the brain is restricted by its own biophysics — there’s only so many ways that electrical signals in the hippocampus can be processed, he said.

“The goal is to improve the quality of life for somebody who has a severe memory deficit,” said Berger. “If I can give them the ability to form new long-term memories for half the conditions that most people live in, I’ll be happy as hell, and so will be most patients.”

Source: http://singularityhub.com/

Age: 54 months Observers 0 Views : 658 Owner: Alan Hacman
Owner: Alan Hacman
Sealed in 01 June 2020 16:43:42
Opened at: 08 August 2020 02:45:00
Forecast

B I LI c-c

Age: 2 months Observers 0 Views : 50 Owner: LA
Owner: LA
Sealed in 08 August 2020 00:00:00
Opened at: 08 August 2020 00:00:01
Sealed with Dogecoin Technology Prediction: We can use Memory-boosting implants in our brains to convert short-term into long-term memories

The hippocampus, a region buried deep within the folds and grooves of the brain, is the critical gatekeeper that transforms memories from short-lived to long-term. In dogged pursuit, Dr. Theodore Berger spent most of the last 35 years trying to understand how neurons in the hippocampus accomplish this complicated feat. At its heart, a memory is a series of electrical pulses that occur over time that are generated by a given number of neurons, said Berger. This is important — it suggests that we can reduce it to mathematical equations and put it into a computational framework.

Age: 0 minute Observers 0 Views : 658 Owner: Upcoming
Owner: Upcoming
Sealed in 27 December 2015 11:55:49
Opened at: 06 August 2020 13:00:00
Dubai to build the world's largest ski slope in the Meydan One complex

Planning your ski trip this winter? St. Moritz, Verbier, Aspen? You can now add the desert kingdom Dubai to your list. This week plans were announced to build the world’s longest indoor ski slope, part of a larger construction project, that when completed, will house the world’s tallest building and the largest ‘dancing’ fountain.

Plans for the Meydan One complex, which will include the 1.2km slope, were announced on Monday by his Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum. The project will cover over 40 million square feet and is estimated to cost $6.8 billion to build. Its date for completion is 2020.

Meydan One will also feature a shopping mall, the 711m tower comprising office blocks apartments and shops, a civic plaza, 4km canal and a marina with 100 yacht berths.

Already boasting an indoor ski centre which runs year round, (despite the summer temperatures which can top 45°c/113°F), it is not the largest in the world, this means competition for the world record hungry UAE. The proposed snow sports arena will flatten the current record holder, the Alpincenter in Germany. At 640m it will be little over half the length of Dubai’s.

“This development is a forward thinking, interactive enterprise geared towards the Dubai of tomorrow. The encouragement and support we have received in the past from our trusted partners will now help the Meydan One development come to life. The first phase will be completed as Dubai prepares to host the World Expo 2020,” said Saeed Humaid Al Tayer, Meydan’s Chairman.

Source: http://www.luxos.com/

Age: 56 months Observers 0 Views : 661 Owner: Al Maktoum
Owner: Al Maktoum
Sealed in 06 August 2020 00:00:00
Opened at: 06 August 2020 00:00:02
Sealed with Dogecoin Dubai to build the world's largest ski slope in the Meydan One complex

As if the world's tallest building, biggest shopping mall and largest man-made island weren't enough. Dubai will soon have another record breaker: a 1.2km ski slope. It will be constructed as part of Meydan One complex, which will cover over 40 million square feet and is estimated to cost $6.8 billion to build. The project will also feature a shopping mall, the 711m tower comprising office blocks apartments and shops, a civic plaza, 4km canal and a marina with 100 yacht berths.

Age: 0 minute Observers 0 Views : 661 Owner: Upcoming
Owner: Upcoming

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